AMS_Local_Chapter
Southeast Arizona Chapter of the American Meteorological Society Seal of SEACAMS
UA Atmospheric Sciences
Chapter Officers:

President: Mr. Ronald L. Holle
Vice President: Mr. Glenn Minuth
Secretary: Ms. Daile Zhang
Treasurer: Mr. Tyler Kranz

contact us: seacams@atmo.arizona.edu

NWS Tucson Office
Homepage of SEACAMS
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Welcome to the homepage of SEACAMS!

SEACAMS is the Southeast Arizona Chapter of the American Meteorological Society, serving greater Tucson and the surrounding areas. Our chapter consists of local meetings held monthly from Fall through Spring hosting professionals from the field of meteorology and related fields. If you are interested in meteorology and want to learn from all our interesting guests please consider becoming a member. National AMS membership is not required; to join our chapter simply come to our meetings and give us your contact information! We do have nominal annual dues which are used to provide snacks and drinks at our meetings.


IMPORTANT!! Previous email system turned down!

As you may recall from our last meeting, the previous SEACAMS email address SEACAMS@ATMO.ARIZONA.EDU has been turned down. There is currently no way for me to check any emails that sent to that address since April. Please contact me with my UA email (dlzhang@email.arizona.edu). Thank you for your understanding.

-Daile


2017 Monsoon Review
Who: John Glueck
When: October 5th
Where: ENRB, Room 253, University of Arizona campus

John Glueck is a senior meteorologist for the National Weather Service (NWS) in Tucson. He started his NWS career in Kodiak Alaska in January 1990 as a meteorologist intern. After nearly two and a half year on Kodiak Island, he was transferred to Fairbanks, Alaska. In early 1995 he accepted a general forecaster position in Tucson and was later promoted to senior meteorologist in 2002. Outside of his normal forecasting duties, John is the office climate focal point and maintains the office website. This will be John’s fourteenth monsoon review talk for SEACAMS.

The monsoon, or the summer thunderstorm season, is an exciting time of year for Arizonans with fantastic lighting displays, dust storms, heavy rain, extended dry and hot periods and the possibility for tropical storms to impact the southeast Arizona. John will give an extensive review of this four month period in which the annual monsoon occurs.


The status of the UofA HAS programs
Who: Dr. Eric Betterton and Brittany Ciancarelli
When: Wednesday, 31 May at 6:30 pm
Where: ENRB1 Room 253

We have the opportunity for Dr. Eric Betterton, Director of the newly-formed Dept. of Hydrology and Atmospheric Sciences to speak to SEACAMS about the merger of the two departments. Also, Brittany Ciancarelli has agreed to speak first about the online program that she manages.

Mini-presentation by Glenn Minuth

Title: The Safford Hail Event

Description: Perhaps few remember this event and there was not much news coverage at the time for most folks to have even known about it, not to mention, Safford is a small town without a TV station. For our neighborhood location in southeastern Arizona, this was a seldom seen type of thunderstorm occurrence. We will look at the both the weather and damage observations for what transpired late one fall evening last year in the Gila Valley.


NEXRAD Doppler dome tour

The Central AZ Chapter of AMS will be having a Doppler dome tour on

Saturday, May 6, from 10-11AM. The radar is the National Weather Service WSR-88D (NEXRAD). The dome is located in east Mesa at the Gateway Airpark (right next to the 202). They need a count and names in advance, especially for non-U.S. citizens. Any foreign national will need to fill out additional paperwork.

Directions to the radar dome: Go to Gateway Airport Ray Road entrance. Turn south on Sossaman Road and continue approximately 3 miles until you reach the radar dome (on the west side of the road).


The Most Important Weather Forecast of All Time
Who: Glenn Minuth
When: @ 6:30 pm on Thursday, April 6
Where: ENRB 253

In 1944 during WWII allied meteorologists were shouldered with the

weather prediction for Operation Overlord (the Normandy Invasion

phase was known as Operation Neptune). Years of detailed planning

went into the D-Day invasion on June 6, 1944, but success hinged on

one element that no military commander could influence—the weather.

With a simple: "OK, we'll go," Eisenhower launched the invasion based

on a weather forecast not all members of his staff agreed with. It

was almost 73 years ago that Gen. Eisenhower's chief meteorologist,

Group Capt. James Martin Stagg, made one of the most important

weather forecasts of all time. How did he do this at his young age?

Was he even a meteorologist? Find out how this forecast went down.

Presenter Bio:

Glenn is a retired (35 years) Department of Defense

(green/white/blue/purple service assignments) civil servant who

worked at various duty stations where his positions included

cartographer (programmer/analyst); Instructor, National Defense

University; IT Specialist; and IT Project Manager/Team

Leader/Division Chief. His bachelors and graduate degrees are in

geography with specialties in cartography, geomorphology, remote

sensing, and geology. Others areas of academic focus included

biogeography (flora/fauna), weather/climate, and pedology (soils). He

taught geography, weather & climate, and geology part time in the Life

and Physical Science Department of American River College and

Sacramento City College in Sacramento, California for seven years.

He's been a part time instructor in geography and geology for 20 plus

years in Cochise College credit and non-credit programs at multiple

campuses where he conducts field trips and lectures in the areas

of--military history, history, ecology, weather/climate, geography,

and geology. He also offers similar programs to various eco-tourism

groups and local clubs.


2017 SARSEF Fair Judges Needed

Come inspire the next generation of innovators, critical thinkers, and problem solvers! Sign up to judge the top K-12 research projects at the SARSEF Fair and interact with the brightest minds in the region. 95,000 students from all over Southern Arizona have competed to represent their school among the 2000 projects at the SARSEF Fair, and we need your help rewarding their incredible work.

Judging takes place Thursday, March 30th, from 7:30am-1:00pm for Elementary and Middle School, and 7:30am-4:30pm for High School. Breakfast and lunch are provided!

To register, please go to sarsef.org/judges/sign-up-now/ to create an account and select your category preferences by March 28th.

To review categories, qualifications, and more, please visit our website: sarsef.org

Can't judge but still want to be involved? Volunteers are needed anytime between 8am-8pm March 29th through April 1st for a variety of tasks. Please go to https://sarsef.org/volunteers/sarsef-week-volunteers/ to learn more.

If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact us at liz@sarsef.org

Thank you for supporting the students of Southern Arizona!


Reporting Weather in Southern Arizona
Who: Tom Beal
When: March 2, 2017
Where: ENRB 253

Beal will narrate a photographic slideshow of the extreme events he has covered over four decades in Arizona. Among them: the hurricane-fueled floods that toppled homes and bridges into Southern Arizona rivers in October 1983; the devastating Rodeo-Chediski and Bullock/Aspen fires in 2002 and 2003; the debris flows in the Santa Catalina Mountains in 2006 and the deadly dust-channel storms and towering haboobs of the current decade.


All-Arizona AMS Chapter Meeting
Who: Ralph Wetmore
When: 1:00-2:15 pm February 11, 2017
Where: ENRB 253

February's meeting, like last year's, will be an all-state/all-chapters meeting this time hosted by the Southeast AZ Chapter of the American Meteorological Society or SEACAMS in Tucson!

Here are the details:

Saturday, February 11, 2017 - Tucson, Arizona

11:30 to 1:00pm – Lunch TBA (Optional Meet-up Before)

1:00 to 2:15pm – Presentation/Meeting in ENRB 253 featuring Ralph H. Wetmore II: Thirty Years of Lightning Photography in Southern Arizona

2:30 to 4:00pm – NWS Tucson Forecast Office Tour (ENRB 3rd Floor)

4:00pm – NWS Tucson 00Z Radiosonde Launch

University of Arizona

Dennis Deconcini Environment and Natural Resources Building (ENRB)

520 N. Park Ave (SW Corner of Campus)

Campus Map: http://map.arizona.edu//

Parking Information: https://parking.arizona.edu//


We're on the AMS Fall/Winter 2016 Chapter Newsletter

The Southeast Arizona Chapter of the American Meteorological Society (SEACAMS) had a tour to the local TV station KGUN 9 with the chief meteorologist Erin Christiansen at Tucson, Arizona on Monday, October 25th. In this tour, SEACAMS members took a behind-the-scenes look at the KGUN 9 broadcast facility, as well as an on-air (live) broadcast. Erin also explained how she gathers and posts current weather data, and how she uses a subscription service to acquire weather information. SEACAMS members also used the camera and blank screen to try to make a TV weather broadcast like Erin.

Check out this link: https://www.ametsoc.org/ams/index.cfm/about-ams/ams-local-chapters/local-chapter-affairs-newsletters/ams-local-chapter-newsletter-volume-6-issue-2-fall-winter-2016/?utm_source=Subscribers&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=Newsletter&_zs=kvhhc1&_zl=MsIQ3/


Meeting Photo


Meeting Photo

Hokie Storm Chasers


Hokie Storm Chasers & METCON
Who: Ashley Athey
When: November 17th (Thursday) @ 6:30 pm
Where: ENRB, Room 253, University of Arizona campus

Abstract:

Each spring, the Virginia Tech Geography Department conducts a field course in severe weather forecasting on location in the Great Plains. This 3-credit course teaches students methods used in the prediction of severe thunderstorms and tornadoes, and provides the opportunity to observe these storms firsthand. My time as a Hokie Storm Chaser was the highlight of my college career. In the first segment of my presentation I will share my storm chasing experience along with photos and videos from current and previous Hokie Storm Chasers.

I work as a meteorologist and geospatial analyst at Meteorological Connections, LLC (METCON). Our company provides tailored Geographic Information System (GIS) based weather analysis and forecasts to the Department of Defense, CIA, and several private weather companies. METCON combines historical, current, and forecast weather and uses GIS principles to determine the impacts of weather across the globe for crop, energy, and critical decision making applications. The second segment of my presentation will provide an overview of the work I do at METCON which includes global flood modeling, climate analysis, and forecast product creation.

Bio: Ashley received her B.S. in Meteorology, B.A. in Geography, and M.S. in Geography with a focus in Climatology from Virginia Tech. During her time at Virginia Tech she was a teaching assistant with the Hokie Storm Chasers and received the Outstanding Masters Student of the Year for the College of Natural Resources. She currently works as a meteorologist and geospatial analyst for Meteorological Connections, based out of Johnson City, TN.


Meeting Photo

KGUN9 tour with chief meteorologist Erin Christiansen


Tour of KGUN 9 Studio
Who: Erin Christiansen
When: October 24th at 4:45 PM (No late access to the building)
Where: KGUN 9

This technical tour includes a behind-the-scenes look at the KGUN 9 broadcast facility with a weather broadcast focus provided by the station's Chief Meteorologist, Erin Christiansen. Erin structures the tour so that you can see the technical side of television as well as observe an on-air (live) broadcast. We will observe: the weather set in the news studio; news room news control; and view the control rooms and tape room. Erin will explain how she gathers and posts current weather data; how she uses a subscription service to acquire weather information; explain the camera-monitor set ups; and explain the principles of Chroma key compositing, or chroma keying, a special effects / post-production technique for compositing (layering) two images or video streams together based on color hues (chroma range).


Meeting Photo

2016 Monsoon Review


2016 Monsoon Review
Who: John Glueck
When: September 29th @ 6:30 pm
Where: ENRB, Room 253, University of Arizona campus

John Glueck is a senior meteorologist for the National Weather Service (NWS) in Tucson. He started his NWS career in Kodiak Alaska in January 1990 as a meteorologist intern. After nearly two and a half year on Kodiak Island, he was transferred to Fairbanks, Alaska. In early 1995 he accepted a general forecaster position in Tucson and was later promoted to senior meteorologist in 2002. Outside of his normal forecasting duties, John is the office climate focal point and maintains the office website. This will be John’s fourteenth monsoon review talk for SEACAMS.

The monsoon, or the summer thunderstorm season, is an exciting time of year for Arizonans with fantastic lighting displays, dust storms, heavy rain, extended dry and hot periods and the possibility for tropical storms to impact the southeast Arizona. John will give an extensive review of this four month period in which the annual monsoon occurs.


SEACAMS Schedule for 2016 Fall

September: Annual Monsoon Synopsis by John Glueck, NWS (Thursday, Sep 29th)

October: Channel 9 tour (Monday, Oct 24th)

November: Ashley Athey, Meteorologist at MetCon (Thursday, Nov 17th)

AMS Annual Meeting in Seattle between January 22nd and 26th


Meeting Photo

Another tour at the 25 OWS


WRRC Weekly Wave: Friday, April 15,

"Beyond the Mirage: The Future of Water in the West", a film by Cody Sheehy, Video Coordinator in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS), will be broadcast on PBS 6 on April 15, 2016 at 9 pm. "Beyond the Mirage" is a collaborative project of Arizona Public Media, CALS and the WRRC involving a video-based web experience, a K-12 classroom component, and a documentary film. The WRRC Director, Sharon B. Megdal, who encouraged and supported the project, appears in the documentary's interviews about solving our water issues. Others from UA who were interviewed for "Beyond the Mirage" include Jon Chorover, Professor and Department Head of the Soil, Water and Environmental Science Department, Gregg Garfin, Associate Professor and Associate Extension Specialist in the School of Natural Resources and the Environment, Mike Crimmins, Associate Professor and Associate Extension Specialist in the Soil, Water and Environmental Science Department, and Robert Glennon, Regents' Professor, Morris K. Udall Professor of Law & Public Policy.

The documentary will be broadcast on May 16, 2016, at 9 pm on KAET 8.

There will be two free special screenings and panel discussions in Tucson:

Center for Creative Photography

Wednesday, April 6, 2016, 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

The Loft Cinema

Wednesday, April 11, 2016, 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm


Meeting Photo

Mike Leuthold


An update on the University of Arizona's High Resolution Modeling Program
Who: Mr. Mike Leuthold
When: at 6:30 pm on Thursday, March 17th
Where: ENRB, Room 253

A high resolution configuration of the Weather Research and Forecasting

(WRF) has been run operationally by the Department of Atmospheric Sciences

since 2003. A description of the model configuration and background for the

various model settings will be presented along with an overview of the

custom forecasts created for the end users. Much of the recent work has been

to create forecasts for operational use by power utilities: solar, wind,

temperature/load, and precipitation. As utility partners typically have

limited meteorology expertise, we have created a forecast web portal for

them which takes raw model output and creates tailored forecasts for use by

the partners and some end user forecast examples from our web portal will be

presented.


We are on the Winter/Spring 2016 AMS Local Chapter Affairs Newsletter

The Southeast Arizona Chapter of the American Meteorological Society (SEACAMS) had a tour to the Davis-Monthan Air Force Base 25th Operational Weather Squadron (OWS) at Tucson, Arizona on Tuesday, January 19th. The mission of the 25th OWS is to provide accurate, timely, and relevant weather analyses, forecasts, warnings, and briefings to Air Force, Army, National Guard, Reserve, and Combatant Command forces operating in the western continental United States, Canada and Mexico. Additionally, the 25th OWS produces all aviation hazard forecasts for flight levels above 18,000 feet across the entire U.S. Northern Command area of responsibility. The officers at the OWS explained the responsibilities of the 25 OWS to our SEACAMS members, and gave a tour of the operations floor where the forecasters work. This tour was a great success for southeast Arizona meteorologists. A meteorologist from the Central Arizona Chapter of AMS in Phoenix also joined this visit.

Check out this link: https://www2.ametsoc.org/ams/index.cfm/about-ams/ams-local-chapters/local-chapter-affairs-newsletters/newsletter-pdf/ams-local-chapters-newsletter-vol-5-issue-3//


Meeting Photo

Tim Marshall was presenting.

Courtesy of Central Arizona Chapter of AMS


Tim Marshall's Talk on Feb., 6

When: Saturday, February 6, 2016, 10:30 (presentation) | 12:00pm (Potluck)

Where: MCC Red Mountain Campus RDM-S 140

(https://www.mesacc.edu/maps/red-mountain-campus/)

Who: Tim Marshall

What: "2013 El Reno Tornado"

Here is the link of Tim's presentation:

http://www.centralazweather.com/ElReno_AMS2016.pdf


Meeting Photo


Davis-Monthan Air Force Base Tour on Tuesday, January 19
Who:
When: 6:00 pm on Tuesday, January 19
Where: Davis-Monthan Air Force Base

The mission of the 25th Operational Weather Squadron (OWS) is to provide accurate, timely, and relevant weather analyses, forecasts, warnings, and briefings to Air Force, Army, National Guard, Reserve, and Combatant Command forces operating in the western continental United States, Canada and Mexico. Additionally, the 25th OWS produces all aviation hazard forecasts for flight levels above 18,000 feet across the entire U.S. Northern Command area of responsibility. Finally, as a key component of the Air Force Weather Weapon System, the 25th OWS provides initial qualification and up-grade training for weather forecaster apprentices and weather officer accessions. This meeting will further explain the responsibilities of the 25 OWS. We will also tour the operation floor where questions may be asked about forecast locations, techniques, and products.

-----

Starting at 6 pm, we will meet in the parking lot of the Golf Links Sports Complex, 2400 South Craycroft Road, Tucson, AZ 85711. Look for the white SEACAMS banner where we gather. At 6:30 pm we will travel in multiple vehicles with Air Force volunteers onto the base. You will need to have an identification ready - a U.S. Passport, driver's license, or state ID (foreign identification will not be accepted). Non-U.S. citizens are welcome as long as one of these IDs is available.


Meeting Photo

Mike Olbinski at the talk


Mike Olbinski's Talk: Tuesday, February 9

Mike Olbinski calls himself a storm-chasing wedding photographer, but filmmaker can also added to the title. He's based out of Phoenix, Arizona, and when he's not shooting weddings both here in the U.S. and internationally, he's chasing storms across the desert southwest and also the Central Plains. Apart from loving still photography of lightning, tornadoes and almost any kind of weather, Mike creates time-lapse films a few times a year. His work has been seen across the world, in commercials, documentaries, magazines and even Thor: The Dark World. He tries to maintain his sanity while doing this full-time and being a husband and father of three beautiful children.

The presentation will be the story of how Mike got started, what inspired him, where it's taken him, a brief overview of how he creates a film, and then a showing of Monsoon II!


2016 SEACAMS Meetings

--January 19: Davis Monthan Air Force Base.

--February 6: Tim Marshall in Phoenix area.

--February 9: Mike Olbinski.


Davis-Monthan Air Force Base Tour on Tuesday, January 19

The mission of the 25th Operational Weather Squadron (OWS) is to provide accurate, timely, and relevant weather analyses, forecasts, warnings, and briefings to Air Force, Army, National Guard, Reserve, and Combatant Command forces operating in the western continental United States, Canada and Mexico. Additionally, the 25th OWS produces all aviation hazard forecasts for flight levels above 18,000 feet across the entire U.S. Northern Command area of responsibility. Finally, as a key component of the Air Force Weather Weapon System, the 25th OWS provides initial qualification and up-grade training for weather forecaster apprentices and weather officer accessions. This meeting will further explain the responsibilities of the 25 OWS. We will also tour the operation floor where questions may be asked about forecast locations, techniques, and products. Plan to arrive before 6:30 pm to allow for security. Full details will be sent before the meeting.


All-Arizona AMS Chapter Talk by Tim Marshall, Mesa, Saturday, February 6

The talk by Tim Marshall, Engineer and Meteorologist at Haag Engineering Co., Irving Texas is tentatively planned for 10:30 am. He will speak on his 31 May 2013 El Reno, Oklahoma EF5 tornado chase, its damages, and the unfortunate accompanying fatalities. This will be followed by a potluck BBQ around noon (pulled pork, hot dogs), then a possible hike or tour of the ADOT accommodations to the CAP and flood structures when they installed the 202 freeway about five years ago. The tentative location is Red Mountain Community College, Mesa (access via 202 freeway...east Mesa).


The SNOTEL Network and Snow Surveys @ Scottsdale Community College

Forward from Central Arizona Chapter:

-------------------------------------------------------------------

Please join us for our next Chapter meeting in early December! Our

featured speaker will be Dino DeSimone from the Natural Resource

Conservation Service presenting on the SNOTEL Network and Snow Surveys.

Attached is a brochure about the SNOTEL Network

along with some info specifically

about the Arizona Snow Survey program if you'd like to read up a little on

them before the meeting.

-------------------------------------------------------------

Wednesday, December 2, 2015

The SNOTEL Network and Snow Surveys

7:00pm - Reception

7:30pm - Meeting

Scottsdale Community College - Chaparral Campus SL 116

-------------------------------------------------------------

We'll keep an eye on any ADOT construction updates for the Loop 101 Pima.

All of the Chaparral on/off ramps were closed up until this past weekend

and ADOT was advertising

a re-open date for the Chaparral ramps the end of last week. We'll be sure

to include any updates in following reminder emails, but plan on just a

little extra travel time getting through and/or around the construction on

your way to SCC.

Have a great start to your week and enjoy the cooler weather!!

The Executive Steering Committee

Dan, Mary, Wendy, Erin, Nancy and Jessica


We are on the Fall/Winter 2015 AMS Local Chapter Affairs Newsletter

See us at: https://www2.ametsoc.org/ams/index.cfm/about-ams/ams-local-chapters/local-chapter-affairs-newsletters/newsletter-pdf/ams-local-chapter-newsletter-volume-5-issue-2/

The Southeast Arizona Chapter of the American Meteorological Society (SEACAMS) joined the National Weather Service Tucson Open House on October 17th, 2015. The occasion was the 75th anniversary of the National Weather Service being in Tucson. Approximately 250 adults and children attended the event. It was the first time that SEACAMS held a booth-type table in such a big event. We showed the audiences the high-speed videos of lightning, as well as fulgurites found in the US. and Egypt. The newly-appointed officers successfully recruited new student members from the University of Arizona and regular members from some other local communities. The event was a great success and SEACAMS helped to make the 75th celebration wonderful!


Meeting Photo


Trying to Stop a Leak in an Operational Global Model
Who: Dr. Thomas J. Galarneau
When: November 5th, 2015. 6:30 pm
Where: ENRB, Room 253, University of Arizona

In this presentation we will show that the National Centers for Environmental Prediction Global Forecast System (GFS) systematically loses 10–15% of the total column precipitable water (PW) over the tropical western North Pacific (defined as the region 0–20°N and 120–180°E) in its medium-range (defined here as days 4–7) forecasts compared to the verifying GFS analysis. The loss of PW in the GFS forecast occurs during quiet regimes when a tropical cyclone (TC) is not present at the initial time. When a TC is present, the loss of PW does not occur in the subsequent GFS forecast, indicating that the GFS performs better when an incipient rotational feature is initialized well. The loss of PW appears to occur as convection gradually decreases and subsidence becomes more prevalent. Additionally, surface winds that are too weak contribute to reduced surface latent heat fluxes, which makes it difficult to replenish water vapor in the lower troposphere. The loss of PW contributes to TC “misses” in medium-range GFS forecasts, cases in which the GFS fails to develop an incipient tropical disturbance into a TC. Given that the PW loss worsens with increasing forecast lead, we hypothesize that it is driven by the model physics (primarily the cumulus parameterization).

Idealized numerical model experiments are used to examine the behavior and evolution of convection and atmospheric water vapor during long model integrations that employ different cumulus parameterizations. Specifically, we will compare a “GFS-like” simulation that uses the Simplified Arakawa-Schubert (SAS) cumulus parameterization to simulations that use the Tiedtke, Kain-Fritsch, and Grell-Freitas cumulus schemes. Preliminary results indicate that convective updrafts early in the model simulation are deeper and more intense in the SAS simulation. The compensating subsidence contributes to rapid drying throughout the rest of the domain. The similar behavior of PW in the SAS simulation and the operational GFS over the tropical west Pacific during 2012–2014 suggests the possibility that modifying and testing the SAS scheme in the idealized framework may offer avenues to explore in modifying and improving the SAS scheme in the operational GFS.


Meeting Photo

Tyler Kranz was talking to two undergrads from University of Arizona


Meeting Photo

SEACAMS' Treasurer Tyler Kranz and Secretary Daile Zhang were showing the audiences high-speed video of lightning and Fulgurites.


NWS Tucson 75th Anniversary Open House

The National Weather Service (NWS) in Tucson will host their 75th Anniversary Open House on October 17th, 2015 between 10 am and 3 pm MST.

Guided tours of the NWS office will be provided. In addition, a balloon launch will be conducted at 12:30 pm MST to demonstrate how the NWS collect weather data from the upper atmosphere and how that information is used in weather models to help predict the weather.

There will also be various educational displays specifically geared for children, but still suited for adults as well.

The street address is 520 N. Park Ave,. Suite 304, Tucson, AZ 85719

Parking Info: A parking map is available at http://parking.arizona.edu/pdf/maps/campus.pdf

- See more at: http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/twc/NWSOpenHouse2015.php


Tim Marshall Will Give a Statewide AMS Chapter Meeting

A statewide AMS Chapter meeting will take place on Saturday, February 6, midday, at a location to be determined in Mesa/Scottsdale area. Guest speaker is Tim Marshall of Haag Engineering, concerning wind damage studies.


Meeting Photo

2015 Monsoon Review Discussion


Meeting Photo

2015 Monsoon Review


2015 Monsoon Review
Who: John Glueck, National Weather Service
When: Thursday, October 1st, 2015
Where: ENRB, Room 253, University of Arizona campus

John Glueck will summarize the 2015 Southwestern Summer Monsoon for SEACAM's first fall meeting on Thursday, October 1st, at 6:30 pm. We will meet at the Environmental and Natural Resources Building (ENRB), Room 253 on the University of Arizona campus. Pizza, soft drinks, water, and snacks will be provided.

Parking Info: A parking map is available at http://parking.arizona.edu/pdf/maps/campus.pdf Toward the bottom of the map at 6th and Park, locate a black box labeled 120 -- that is our building. The hatched area next to ENRB was a parking lot we had used but is the site of a new building under construction and no longer available. Consider parking in one of the "green" lots south of 6th St, such as 7167 or 7102. A permit is NOT required after 5 pm. Or park for a fee in the Sixth Street Garage just east of ENRB and the new building under construction.

Local chapter dues support snacks and beverages at the monthly meetings but membership in the national AMS is not required.

- See more at: http://www.atmo.arizona.edu/~seacams


Saguaros and Effects upon them by the Weather they encounter
Who: William Peachey
When: April 9, Thursday, 2015, 6:30 pm
Where: ENRB, Room 253, University of Arizona

In 1997 detailed data began to be gathered concerning the blooming of saguaro cacti (Carnegiea gigantea) on the Red Hills Saguaro Plot(RHSP). The RHSP is located at a mean elevation of 1,007m/ 3,520ft in the Rincon Valley of eastern Pima Co., Arizona. The plot covers an area of .96 hectare and is composed of an array of adjacent 10m by 10m subplots that rise up the south aspect of a linear ridge in 8 rows and that proceed nearly due east-west in 12 columns.

From 2003 through 2014 the annual bloom production of the RHSP revealed that at the landscape scale the differences in year-to-year production have been essentially entirely due to the advent of discrete weather events that have manifested in this saguaro population effects due extreme heat(and/or water loss) and cold.

From other ongoing studies undertaken, some additional aspects of the weather - such as wind or precipitation followed by wind - have been hypothesized to "stack" their negative effects over time and thereby reduce the lifespans of individuals to entire populations of saguaros.

Also, there will be a mini-presentation by Glenn Minuth.

Meteorological Isopleths: Do you know them all?

To understand atmospheric functions, you must be able to understand howvariables (temperature, pressure, winds, humidity, clouds, and energy) are changing in time and how they are changing with respect to one another. The weather map is a tool that aids this understanding. Various kinds of maps, or charts, are used to graphically depict these variables. A good map allows you to quickly identify patterns.

Maps depicting weather conditions are drawn based on simultaneous observations made at many places throughout the world. Accurate portrayal of these observations is the key to a correct interpretation of the data. Meteorologists use a technique called contour analysis to visually explain the information the

data is providing. Contouring data represents an elementary step in data analysis. Ability to correctly and confidently analyze data is critical to interpreting conditions. For example, contouring is vital in:

-Finding the location of atmospheric fronts.

-Locating potential regions of severe thunderstorms.

-Tracking hurricanes.

How well do you know "your" METEOROLOGICAL ISOPLETHS? Not to worry because we will review them. The bet is: you will see some for the first time ever!


Southern AZ Science and Engineering Fair
Who:
When: March 9-14, 2015
Where: Tucson Convention Center

We need volunteers in 4 hour shifts March 9th through March 14th from 8:00am-8:00pm most days (and until 10pm on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday). For more details and to sign up, go to: http://sarsef.org/volunteers/sarsef-week-volunteers/

Judging Day is Tuesday March 10th, from 7:30am-12:30pm for Elementary and Middle School levels and from 7:30am-4:30pm for High School. As always, we will provide you with a training that morning as well as a great breakfast and lunch!

To sign up to be a Grand Judge, please go to: http://sarsef.org/judges/sign-up-now/ and click the "add" button once you sign in.

To learn more about qualifications , categories , and for directions to the TCC, please visit: http://sarsef.org/judges/

Please Volunteer! From greeters who help the kids get set up to working in retail as students buy souvenirs to data entry, your time makes a difference!


Meeting Photo


Visit to Vaisala (Lightning Detectors)
Who: Ron Holle
When: Tuesday, March 3, at 6:30 pm
Where: Vaisala

Our March meeting will be on Tuesday, March 3rd at 6:30 pm at Vaisala, located one mile north of the Tucson International Airport terminal. The meeting will include a tour of the Network Operations Center, where lightning detection networks over the U.S., Canada, and the globe are monitored and controlled. Also shown will be road network monitoring in several U.S. states, and airport de-icing decision support systems at several airports. A short presentation about Vaisala will follow. Pizza and beverages will be provided.


How Weather Can Affect Electric Utilities
Who: Ted Burhans, TEP
When: Tuesday, Feb 3, 6:30 pm
Where: ENRB, Room 253, University of Arizona

Ted Burhans from Tucson Electric Power (TEP) will discuss how weather can impact operations, affect pricing and supply of wholesale energy, and what is being done to account for how weather impacts renewable technologies.

Glenn Minuth will do a mini-presentation on "Building On Meteorological “Blocks”: Atmospheric blocking leads to a stagnation of weather patterns."


Southern AZ Science and Engineering Fair
Who: SARSEF and You
When: March 9-14, 2015
Where: Tucson Convention Center

SARSEF will need volunteers throughout this week: 2-4 hour shifts between 7:30 a.m. and 10:00 p.m. Monday is a busy day as students arrive with their projects and set them up. Although Tuesday is Judging Day, volunteers also work “behind the scenes” in addition to needing Judges. Wednesday, Thursday and Friday are days that the TCC is open to the public and many student groups come through. Saturday is for taking down and cleaning up from 8:00-noon.

Three additional special events will also take place during the week. Cox Future Innovator’s Night is on Wednesday, March 11, at 5:00-8:30 pm with over 2000 people attending; there will be hands-on activities for area youth. On Thursday (March 12) 6:30-8:30 and Friday (March 13) 7:00-9:00 will be the awards assemblies, requiring volunteers.

If able to volunteer again this year, please go to the website: sarsef.org and register. All volunteers need to sign up using the website for insurance purposes. You have two options to sign in:

1. If you volunteered last year you may already have a user account. You can use this to register again this year and simply Login.

2. If you did not register last year, click on “Register as a New User” to create an account. It is a new registration process and you should find it is simple to do.


Coyote Unmanned Aircraft System
Who: Drew Osbrink, Sensintel Inc
When: Wed, Nov 19, 2014, 6:30 pm
Where: Room 253, the ENRB, University of Arizona campus

On Wednesday, 19 Nov, at 6:30 pm, the Coyote Program (hurricane remote sensing) presenter, Drew Osbrink, of Sensintel Inc will discuss "The Coyote Unmanned Aerial System and Hurricane Forecasting Utilizing Persistent Unmanned Systems." The meeting will take place in Room 253, of the ENRB, University of Arizona campus.

The Coyote Unmanned Aircraft System, developed and operated by Sensintel Inc in Tucson, AZ has become the first UAS to be dropped into a hurricane from a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) P3 Hurricane Hunter aircraft. The Coyote, a 13-lb, 5-ft wing span, tube-deployed UAS was originally developed in 2004 for the US Navy. NOAA recently deployed a handful of these aircraft into Hurricane Edouard to collect a variety meteorological data including, barometric pressure, wind speed, humidity, and temperature. The Coyote allows researchers to gather data horizontally, instead of just vertically with dropsondes, in the boundary layer where it is too dangerous to fly the P3. It is expected that this data will help researchers at the National Hurricane Center improve intensity predictions, with which it has struggled for decades. This will allow forecasters to refine predictions and thus assist disaster management personnel to devote resources to exactly where they will be required. The presentation at the November SEACAMS meeting will summarize the Coyote UAS, the recent mission into Hurricane Edouard, and what comes next.


Ordering 4 inch rain gauges from COCORAHS

Esty Pape had the idea that we (SEACAMS members) could order (prepaid by customers) a few 4” rain gauges from Cocorahs, in order to save on shipping. There are 3 people already interested in replacing or buying new rain gauges. If 2 more people join the order, we could save the most on shipping ($2/each item).

If anyone is interested in joining the order, email Ann Hollis at annhollis@usa.net. We will then coordinate payment with those involved with the order.

http://www.weatheryourway.com/cocorahs/rgcoco.htm



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